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High Steel Bridge

High Steel Bridge

This is the view over the north edge of the High Steel Bridge. This bridge is 420 feet above the Skokomish River. This little cataract flows into the Skokomish. When taking pictures over these kinds of edges, I like to brace my knee against something solid before looking through, or at the camera. This isn’t the time to get vertigo when shifting your zoom or focus on the camera.

To give an idea of how high this bridge is, see this video about a helicopter rescue underneath the bridge. That helicopter pilot has some iron nerves.

While this is the highest bridge in Washington, it is not the highest in the US.

mcdewey

Bridge Over Boulder Creek

Bridge Over Boulder Creek

This picture was been in process for a long time. This was taken in March. I have always liked the scene and composition but there were a few technical difficulties to address.

  1. The lens filter had a bit of schmutz on it and it fuzzed up one part of the image.
  2. The sun is behind the canyon wall which is behind the barn. This caused a lens flare in the image.

I had to increase my editing skills in Aperture to fix these up.

In addition to my typical adjustments (crop, exposure, contrast, saturation) I used other adjustments on specific parts of the image. I used;

  • Burn
  • Tint
  • Retouch

Let me know if you can see where I worked the image.

mcdewey

Blizzarded

Blizzarded

While the storm was not quite all it was cracked up to be. It was enough. The 6 to 12 inches of snow turned into 3 or 4. But, when you are a plant that is only 2 inches tall, it’s enough.

I rewalked the path I took in Blizzard Warning to see how spring is surviving in the snow storm. In a way, the snow is a help. It went from 66 degrees to 15 degrees in one day. The blanket of snow helps protect the plants from the bitter cold air.

As always, the snow really dresses up the place.

IMG_3928
Snow Coat

 

mcdewey

Bridge

Bridge

Staying on a train theme, but in a different city.

These are the supporting timbers for a train bridge in Lafayette. This section of track is relatively unused. It brings train cars to the few businesses that are in this area.

I suspect, but cannot find backing data, that the roman numerals are on the timbers to assist in assembly of the bridge. The parts were constructed offsite and sent for final assembly.

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